Artwork of the Week 33

cyclonVictim of Cyclone Eline by TapiwaMatsikire

The image depicts a village hit by Cyclone–Eline, which was the longest-lived Indian Ocean tropical cyclone on record.Most houses are completely damaged and immersed in water, leaving many people homeless, and in dire need of assistance.

cyclonVictim of Cyclone Eline by TapiwaMatsikire

The image depicts a village hit by Cyclone–Eline, which was the longest-lived Indian Ocean tropical cyclone on record.Most houses are completely damaged and immersed in water, leaving many people homeless, and in dire need of assistance.
This week on the 19th of August we celebrate the World Humanitarian Day (WDH). Humanitarian work involves helping or improving the welfare of people. It is about alleviating the suffering of people in crisis situations, and promoting human welfare and social reforms.
This year’s celebrations are running under the theme: One Humanity. One humanity speaks to how our shared human experiences bind us across divides, and create a common responsibility to demand action for the most vulnerable and at risk of being left behind.
Every day, humanitarian aid workers stand on the front lines of war and disaster, braving tremendous dangers and difficulties to deliver assistance to those who need it the most. Humanitarian Day is a timely opportunity to reflect on our own lives, and what we as individuals can do to help others and how we can make a difference. It is about celebrating the spirit of Humanitarian work.
The day was designated by the General Assembly seven years ago to coincide with the anniversary of the 2003 bombing of the United Nations headquarters in Baghdad, Iraq.World Humanitarian Day recognizes the aid workers who risk their lives in humanitarian service, and mobilizes people to advocate for humanitarian action.
 Under the overarching theme of One Humanity, WHD will promote how the world came together in Istanbul around the Agenda for humanity, and the commitments made at the people around the world who need humanitarian assistance to survive.
Year after year there are severe natural disasters in many parts of the world as well as wars of insurgency whichdestroy lives, infrastructureand displace people from their homes rendering them incapable of fending for themselves.  This is even more intense in the world’s poorest and marginalised economies like Africa.
According to the World Humanitarian Summit, around the world, humanitarian action is saving lives every day. Today over 100 million women, men and children need daily life-saving humanitarian assistance.In such times of suffering, humanitarian aid workers, are helping millions of people around the world, regardless of who they are and where they are.
However, many humanitarian aid workers have been killed while reaching out and helping in rebuilding and rehabilitating victimised communities. More than 800 aid workers worldwide have been assassinated, blown up by mines or other explosive devices, abducted or killed accidentally with the people they were aiding over the last 10 years. There is need to consider humanitarian aid workers safety in ensuring that they are able to fully assist people in crisis situations without being caught in the crossfire.
People do not necessarily have to wait for the World Humanitarian Day to do something good, but should just share their kindness around and do something good, somewhere, for someone else. This can be in form of anything like, delivering a meal to a homeless person; holding the elevator door for someone; sharing your skills in a community project; helping an older person with their shopping bags; taking a disabled neighbour to the park; reading to a sick child in the hospital; sharing jokes with the elderly in a home; giving away something you don't use; or just sharing a smile.

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