artists

  • Michele Mathison

    Michele Mathison was born in 1977 in Johannesburg, South Africa and raised between Harare and Bulawayo, Zimbabwe. At present, he lives and works between Zimbabwe and South Africa, practising as a sculptor. Having grown up in Zimbabwe, Mathison draws inspiration from ordinary objects associated with southern

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  • Webster Mubayirenyi

    Webster Mubayirenyi was born in Chitungwiza in 1976. He studied at the B.A.T School of Arts at the National Gallery of Zimbabwe. Mubayirenyi has taken part in numerous exhibitions over the past 10 years including Dumela hosted by the BAT School of Arts in 2008, Unity by Gallery Delta in 2009, the COTCO Exhibition in

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  • Crispen Chakanyuka

    Chrispen Chakanyuka(1943-2002) was a Zimbabwean sculptor and art teacher.Chakanyuka was taught by Joram Mariga to sculpt before he moved on to the Nyarutso Art Centre where he spent two years sculpting and working as an art teacher. He also taught a number of young sculptors at Tengenenge Farm in

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  • Ishmael Chitiyo

    Considered as one of the promising artists to emerge from the Chapungu Centre, Ishmael Chitiyo was born in 1982 in Chitungwiza. Ishmael received his training as an artist under the guidance of his eldest brother, Ignatius Zuwakiyi and the famous 1st generation sculptor Sylvester Mubayi. His sculpture has become quite

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  • Arthur Azevedo

    Born in 1935 in Zimbabwe, Arthur Azevedo trained as a teacher at St Augustine’s College in Cape Town. His interest in sculpture began in 1963 as a result of his dissatisfaction and lack of fulfilment as a painter. He chose to use scrap, found iron and steel which soon became his dominant medium. He developed his own

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  • Ennica Mukomberanwa

    Born in 1978, Erica Mkomberanwa is an award winning sculptor. She is the daughter of Grace Mukomberanwa and renowned sculptor Nicholas Mukomberanwa, who served as her mentors. In 2004, she was awarded a prize which allowed her to travel to Stockholm, Copenhagen, Scotland, and Canada. She was one of the

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  • Fanizani Akuda

    Akuda Fanizani (born 1932-2011) is best known for his ‘whistler’ figures. In these stylised figures, the archetypal face with its slit eyes is given a thin mouth line with a simple centrally placed borehole. In 1988, Fanizani’s sculpture Snake Man was highly commended in the Zimbabwe Heritage Exhibition, the annual

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  • Locadia Ndandarika

    Born in 1945 in Bindura Locardia Ndandarika is a Zimbabwean sculptor. Growing up, Locardia learnt to make clay models of animals using traditional methods. In 1986 Ndandarika joined the BAT Visual Arts Studio to further develop her artistic career. Since then, Locadia’s works have been shown regularly in the Zimbabwe

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  • Agnes Nyangongo

    Agnes Nyanhongo (born 1960) is a Zimbabwean sculptor. Agnes began sculpting full-time early in life having been born into a family of sculptors, and in 1983 she enrolled at the B.A.T. Workshops at the National Gallery of Zimbabwe. Stylistically, her work takes as its theme female issues of various sort. Nyanhongo is

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  • Gregory Mutasa

    Gregory Mutasa is one of the most prominent names among the second generation of Zimbabwean Sculptors. Born in 1959 in Rusape, Mutasa’s graceful sculptures of the female form are instantly recognisable and most sought after by collectors worldwide. Mutasa prefers to work with harder stones such as

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  • Chenjerai Mutasa

    Chenjerai Mutasa is a Zimbabwean artists who is known to bring to life the junk that people toss out. Using old car parts, wire, driftwood, metal and stone, mostly claimed from the scrap yards, Mutasa builds beautiful and imaginative sculptures. His art has taken him to Europe several times as well, and he now travels

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  • Stanford Derere

    Stanford Derere is a Zimbabwean sculptor. Born in the village of Chapeyama, Derere’s formal training as a youth took began at the Peter Burgh School of Art and ended with the famed BAT Workshop of the National Gallery of Zimbabwe. There he learned painting and printmaking. He later switched to sculpture, and has

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  • Taylor Nkomo

    Born in Bulawayo in 1953, Taylor Nkomo is a well-known painter and print maker. As a sculptor he transfers a stone, a thing of beauty into an even more beautiful object. His work is described as elegant and formally striking. His subject matter deals with rural life, and the beauty and dignity that people lend to everyday

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  • Joe Mutasa

    Born in Rusape in 1964, Joe Mutasa maintains that he was born a sculptor. He began his career carving realistic heads and animals using verdite a hard, brilliant green stone unique to Zimbabwe. Mutasa however developed more interest in portraying feeling and emotions from within which made his stop working with verdite

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  • Anderson Mukomberanwa

    Anderson Mukomeranwa (1968-2003) was a Zimbabwean artist known primarily for his stone sculpture. Anderson, who obtained a Btech degree from the Harare Polytechnic College, began his career by studying with his father working with hard stones. Later in his career he took up printmaking, becoming interested in

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  • Semina Mpofu

    Born in Bulawayo in 1968 Semina Mpofu worked for some years at Dominic Benhura Studios where she developed her own unique style in the arts world. Her diverse works are usually in mixed media stones. In 2008 Mpofu scooped the Outstanding Mix Media award for her work titled Mhodzi in the visual arts category.

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  • Arthur Fata

    Born in Harare in 1963 and studied Fine Art at the BAT Workshop School at the National Gallery of Zimbabwe. It was here that he first used painting, printmaking and textiles as well as sculpture to express his ideas. Fata endlessly experiments in combining materials such as wire, wood, string and steel with sound stone

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  • Dominic Benhura

    Dominic Benhura (born 1968) is a Zimbabwean sculptor. Benhura began his career in sculpting at the age of 10 when he studied under his cousin Tapfuma Gutsa, an established sculptor in his own right. Dominic soon began carving himself, making small offcuts before moving onto large stone and he sold his first piece at

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  • Eddy Masaya

    Eddie Masaya (born 1960) is a Zimbabwean sculptor.Masaya was among the first of the second generation of Zimbabwean sculptors to break away from the stylistic restraints imposed by earlier artists. His works are known for their ghostly quality, and are rougher in textures than those of the previous generation.

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  • Joseph Muzondo

    Joseph Muzondo (born 1953) is a Zimbabwean painter and sculptor. Taught informally in sculpting by his uncle, Muzondo subsequently joined National Gallery B.A.T. Workshop in Harare, Zimbabwe. He also studied textile design in Tanzaniaand graphic arts in Austria, and has exhibited worldwide. His work is in the

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  • Edward Chiwawa

    Edward Chiwawa (born 1935) is a Zimbabwean sculptor.  Born northwest of Guruve, he learned to sculpt by working with his cousin, Henry Munyaradzi. From 1971 until 1973 he was a resident of the Tengenenge Sculpture Community. His sculptures are often heavily abstracted. Chiwawa has exhibited in many countries

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  • Paul Gwichiri

    Paul Gwichiri was born in Nyanga, in 1938, and he joined the National Gallery of Zimbabwe in 1962 as an attendant. He started carving in 1964 and joined the Workshop School in the same year. His work tells many stories about traditional times in Zimbabwe and is often couched in a spiritual language. It reveals the

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  • Josiah Manzi

    Born in 1933 Josiah Manzi started sculpting stone in 1967. Manzi’s work evolves from his cultural and spiritual roots. Some of his sculptures lovingly represent a relationship with the world and its inhabitants and its naturalistic statements about the world around him. In 2004, Josia won three million dollars at the NAMA

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  • Amali Malola

    Amali Malola was born in 1921.His sculptures often represent figures based on funny, but mostly true stories. In 2003 he won in a competition in Harare and twice in exhibitions that were held by the Korean Embassy at Tengenenge in 2005 and 2006 respectively. Malola died in 2015 at the age of 105 and he was still active in

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  • Charlse Fernando

    Charlse Fernando (1941- 1995) was a Zimbabwe abstract painter and jazz musician. As a Jazz player, Fernando's works were heavily influenced by the rhythmic music, signs, notes, and instruments. His works showed similarities with the music he played and showed similarities to symbols, painted in vibrant colours.

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  • Boira Mteki

    Born in Harare in 1946 (-1991), BoiraMteki was among early students of Frank McEwen’s Workshop School. He was among the first of the workshop’s sculptors to use the harder native stones, such as serpentine, granite, limestone, and springstone which were then available. Mtekiwas also instrumental in encouraging

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  • Thomas Mukarobgwa

    Thomas Mukarobgwa was born in Nyanga in 1924 and he died 1999. Mukarobgwa began his artistic career as a painter, and was one of McEwen's early standouts along with Joseph Ndandarika, but turned towards sculpture as this medium took off amongst his peers. His sculptures were generally more rounded

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  • Victor Nyakauru

    Born in 1997, Victor Nyakauru is a mixed media sculptor. Having become interested in art, he joined the Visual Art Studios of the National Gallery in 2005 where he studied for three years until 2007. Hespecialises in creating animal forms from a variety of materials including stone, metal, wood, plastic, bone and other

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  • Sylvester Mubayi

    Born in 1942, Mubayi is one of the last surviving links to the early days of modern Zimbabwean sculpture. His work is inspired by a world of spirit and supernatural forces often fusing people and the animal world. He has exhibited extensively since 1968 in many parts of the world and has work in major collections in Europe and

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  • Tapfuma Gutsa

    Tapfuma Gutsa (born 1956) is a renowned Zimbabwean sculptor. Gutsa studied sculpture with Cornelius Manguma at the Driefontein Mission School, later becoming the first Zimbabwean recipient of a British Council award. Gutsa is unique among Zimbabwean stone sculptors as he his sculptures incorporate paper,

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  • Bernard Matemera

    Bernard Matemera, born 1946–2006, was one of the first artists to take up sculpting full-time. Matemera sculpted mainly in grey or black serpentine, finishing his work to a uniform polished surface. His subjects were animals, people or fantasy spirit creatures. Matemera gained international acclaim as he was invited to

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  • Henry Munyaradzi

    Born in 1931(-1998) Henry Munyaradzi was one of Zimbabwe’s pacesetting sculptors. His sculptures blended the simplicity of the primitive with stylized sophistication. Henry soon gained worldwide recognition, which saw him having eight(8) one man shows at venues such as Los Angeles, Berlin and Heidelberg.

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  • Joseph Ndandarika

     Born in 1940 (-1991),Joseph Ndandarikaattended the Serima Mission where he was taught drawing and carving by Fr John Groeber and Cornelius Maguma. His art career experienced a transition as he began with painting then later on moved to sculpting through carving and modelling. Ndandarikaworked endlessly with the

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  • Coleen Madamombe

    Colleen Madambombe was born in 1964 and died 2009. As one of only a few of women sculptors in Zimbawe, often considered as the best, Colleen holds an inspirational role within the stone sculpture movement. She boldly tackled the issues within society and the nature of her craft and use of the heavy Spring Stone

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  • Joram Mariga

    Born in 1927, Joram Mariga has often been referred to as the father of Zimbabwean Sculpture due to his significant contributions towards the growth of the local artistic community, starting in the 1950s and continuing until his death in 2000. Many of his sculptures were carved in spring stone but Joram also used more

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  • Nicholas Mukomberanwa

    Nicholas Mukomberanwa (1940-2002) was a Zimbabwean sculptor and art teacher. Mukomberanwa began his art career at the Serima Mission School where he learnt drawing, patterning and wood carving. His sculptures showed human forms and also depicted animals, birds or spiritual feelings. One of Nicholas’s works,

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  • John Takawira

    Born in Chegutu, John Takawira (1938-1989) was introduced to sculpting by his uncle Joram Mariga at the age of 20. Takawira has been accredited for developing a skeleton theme for his work which enabled him to express his own feelings about the African traditional religion and its beliefs about contact with the spirit world.

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  • Bernard Takawira

    Bernard Takawira (1948–1997) was a Zimbabwean sculptor and a younger brother to John Takawira. Bernard trained as an agricultural advisor to the government after completing school, but was encouraged by John to try carving stone.

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Sylvester Mubayi

Born in 1942, Mubayi is one of the last surviving links to the early days of modern Zimbabwean sculpture. His work is inspired by a world of spirit and supernatural forces often fusing people and the animal world. He has exhibited extensively since 1968 in many parts of the world and has work in major collections in Europe and

North America. Mubayi won the 1969 Oppenheimer Award for sculpture and in 2017 his works were part of the Zimbabwe Pavilion at the 57thVenice Biennale.

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