Running Exhibition

User Rating: 3 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar InactiveStar Inactive
 
Chapter 5

After Shock: Re-Imagining life after Cyclone Idai

Curatorial Statement


Cyclone Idai made landfall in Zimbabwe across Chipinge, Chimanimani, Bikita and Buhera in March of 2019. The most affected areas where Chimanimani and Chipinge. It was said to be one of the worst Indian Ocean tropical cyclones to affect the Southern Hemisphere. The storm caused catastrophic damage in Mozambique, Zimbabwe, and Malawi, leaving more than 1,000 people dead and thousands more missing. The disaster resulted in the loss of lives destruction of crops and livestock; destruction of infrastructure, collapsed lines of communication and road networks, the displacement of internal populations and the fragmentation of families. The cyclone’s exact death toll is not known.

The challenges and risks posed by such natural disasters constitute a transboundary threat to human and wildlife security in the region. Climate change has meant that the severity and frequency of storms has increased and is likely to be on the rise. Drought, warmer air temperatures and rising sea levels mean storm surges will be more powerful, as seen with Cyclone Idai. To mark a year since Cyclone Idai, the National Gallery of Zimbabwe and its partners and sponsors brings to you this exhibition as a reflective project to educate and provoke dialogue on issues pertaining climate change and global warming, disaster preparedness, displacement and many others issues brought about by natural disasters.

Furthermore After Shock: Re Imagining Life after Cyclone Idai exhibition also seeks to educate those who only heard about the cyclone without seeing the magnitude of its impact. The post-disaster context provides necessary insights into art practice as the socio-cultural work of processing the human experience of disaster and aiding in empathic understanding of trauma. Artistic and Cultural responses, such as this exhibition and its public programming are significant in processing and analysing the human experience of disaster, and they also establish a basis for empathising with those affected.

Co-Curated by Raphael Chikukwa and Jekesai Njikizana

Exhibition Chapters

Take a visual journey into the aftermath of Cyclone Idai

team-img

The calm before the storm

Satellite images of the region
team-img

THE EYE OF THE STORM

Chimanimani and Chipinge
team-img

ZIMBABWE RESPONDS

The response
team-img

CLIMATE ACTION

For Sustainable Development

A few quotes from around the world

 

From COVID-19 to climate disruption, from racial injustice to rising inequalities, we are a world in turmoil…We need to build back better with more sustainable, inclusive, gender-equal societies and economies.

-Antonio Guterres, United Nations Secretary General

Cyclone Idai has shown just how vulnerable people are to these kinds of disasters that tear down homes, destroy crops, displace hundreds of thousands of people, and force untold numbers of children out of school that are damaged or that become evacuation centres.
- Jeff Wright, World Vision
I was able to witness firsthand the fury of the cyclone and the great devastation it left in its wake. As we now know, we have lost many citizens, with the human toll likely to reach several hundreds. I came face to face with the horrific accounts of many who continue to grieve the loss of loved ones and are living in the hope of the recovery of their remnants. We continue to work with our neighbouring sister Republic of Mozambique — itself a victim of the same cyclone, to ensure as many remains of our people as possible are recovered and brought back home for decent burials.
-President Emerson Mnangagwa, Zimbabwe
The World Bank has mobilized substantial resources using existing projects in Malawi and Mozambique to provide support for urgent road and water supply repairs, sanitation and hygiene, disease surveillance and prevention, agriculture, and food security. The World Bank management will seek access to additional resources including by working with donors to mobilize trust fund support, and by mobilizing through the International Development Association (IDA) Crisis Response Window (CRW) for medium to long-term recovery and reconstruction efforts to eligible countries.
-World Bank

Idai is the strongest cyclone on record in the Southern Hemisphere. An estimated that 1.5 million children are affected.

- United Nations Children’s Fund

Cyclone Idai is reported to be the deadliest storm system so far this year — and may be the worst disaster ever to strike the southern hemisphere.
-United Nations
This massive campaign is one of many examples where we join hands with partners to help the government strengthen the resilience of communities in emergency situations by working to prevent additional emergencies from occurring.
-Dr. Alex Ntale Gasasira, WHO Representative for Zimbabwe
In Zimbabwe, 100 mile-an-hour winds swept away roads, bridges and destroyed 600 homes (damaging 20,000 others) in the eastern and southern parts of the country, whose 15 million people already live amid a protracted political and humanitarian crisis. The UN estimates that 5.3 million people will require food aid because of the cyclone; the worst since Cyclone Eline struck in 2000.
-Action for Southern Africa

In Partnership with and Sponsored by :

 

Zimbabwe Coat of Arms
Zimbabwe Coat of Arms
Zimbabwe Coat of Arms
Zimbabwe Coat of Arms
Zimbabwe Coat of Arms
Zimbabwe Coat of Arms

 

Zimbabwe Coat of Arms
Zimbabwe Coat of Arms
Zimbabwe Coat of Arms
Zimbabwe Coat of Arms
Zimbabwe Coat of Arms
Zimbabwe Coat of Arms

 

Zimbabwe Coat of Arms
Zimbabwe Coat of Arms
©2020 NGZ Harare. All Rights Reserved. Designed By undisputed

Search